Let's hear it for the internet

SBTRKT feat. Ezra Koenig

—NEW DORP. NEW YORK. (Live on BBCR1)

NEW DORP. NEW YORK. (Live) - SBTRKT feat. Ezra Koenig (BBC Radio 1, Reading and Leeds Maida Vale Special)

(Source: muff-ragic)

ezra koenig

Everybody’s experience of New York is an amalgamation of the eras of New York that they loved the most, whether they were there or not, and usually when they were not there. Whether I’m writing music on the West Coast or writing it here, I’ve got New York in my blood. It’s in my DNA now.

—Rostam Batmanglij (x)

rostam batmanglijvampire weekend

This Is Our Youth, Kenneth Lonergan’s seminal play, opens in previews this week on Broadway amid a buzz rare for the revival of a play in the middle of August, traditionally a dead time for theatrical premieres. About a trio of fraught and directionless post-adolescents in 1982 Manhattan’s Upper West Side, much of the anticipation is due to its marquee cast, with Rookie magazine maven Tavi Gevinson in her first stage role, and Michael Cera and Kieran Culkin rounding out the ensemble. But hiding (or rather, playing) in plain sight is the work of Vampire Weekend’s Rostam Batmanglij, who scored original music for the production; like anything inspired by nineteen-year-olds, it could’ve veered angsty and piercing, but in Batmanglij’s capable hands, it becomes delicate and truly evocative of young adulthood.
When considering the era and music—the dawn of Ronald Reagan, post-disco, post-punk—you could argue it was a moment between moments, which makes the musical process somewhat of a challenge. He name-checks Arthur Russell as an influence, but Batmanglij confesses he relied on personal feelings more than anything referential. “I thought about when I was that age (nineteen, twenty-one),” he says. “I was also living in Morningside Heights, going to college, studying music. So I have all these really specific associations with that.”
Batmanglij conceived much of the music from his new home in Los Angeles where he has lived since the end of last year, after twelve fruitful years in New York. This is his first time back for any extended period, and truth be told, more than any other influence, you hear New York in every note. “Everybody’s experience of New York is an amalgamation of the eras of New York that they loved the most, whether they were there or not, and usually when they were not there,” he says. “Whether I’m writing music on the West Coast or writing it here, I’ve got New York in my blood. It’s in my DNA now.”
(via Vogue)

This Is Our Youth, Kenneth Lonergan’s seminal play, opens in previews this week on Broadway amid a buzz rare for the revival of a play in the middle of August, traditionally a dead time for theatrical premieres. About a trio of fraught and directionless post-adolescents in 1982 Manhattan’s Upper West Side, much of the anticipation is due to its marquee cast, with Rookie magazine maven Tavi Gevinson in her first stage role, and Michael Cera and Kieran Culkin rounding out the ensemble. But hiding (or rather, playing) in plain sight is the work of Vampire Weekend’s Rostam Batmanglij, who scored original music for the production; like anything inspired by nineteen-year-olds, it could’ve veered angsty and piercing, but in Batmanglij’s capable hands, it becomes delicate and truly evocative of young adulthood.

When considering the era and music—the dawn of Ronald Reagan, post-disco, post-punk—you could argue it was a moment between moments, which makes the musical process somewhat of a challenge. He name-checks Arthur Russell as an influence, but Batmanglij confesses he relied on personal feelings more than anything referential. “I thought about when I was that age (nineteen, twenty-one),” he says. “I was also living in Morningside Heights, going to college, studying music. So I have all these really specific associations with that.”

Batmanglij conceived much of the music from his new home in Los Angeles where he has lived since the end of last year, after twelve fruitful years in New York. This is his first time back for any extended period, and truth be told, more than any other influence, you hear New York in every note. “Everybody’s experience of New York is an amalgamation of the eras of New York that they loved the most, whether they were there or not, and usually when they were not there,” he says. “Whether I’m writing music on the West Coast or writing it here, I’ve got New York in my blood. It’s in my DNA now.”

(via Vogue)

rostam batmanglijvampire weekendthis is our youth
"me and @alexdacorte about to get eaten by a truck”
(via Rostam’s instagram)

"me and @alexdacorte about to get eaten by a truck”

(via Rostam’s instagram)

rostam batmanglijvampire weekend
“high and tight”
(via Rostam’s instagram)

high and tight”

(via Rostam’s instagram)

vampire weekendrostam batmanglij

teamvampireweekend:

Behind the scenes photos of Vampire Weekend’s music video for Cape Cod Kwassa Kwassa (directed by Richard Ayoade in 2008)

vampire weekend

VAMPIRE WEEKEND ON THE MAKING OF CONTRA

On August 25th XL Recordings will be releasing Pay Close Attention, a compilation that celebrates the key releases and moments from XL’s 25 year history. The compilation boxset will include a bonus DVD & poster / CD / Download as well as a wealth of new and unseen content - including new interviews and performance footage from Vampire Weekend, The White Stripes, Tyler, the Creator, The Prodigy and Bobby Womack.

(via XL Recordings)

vampire weekendezra koenigrostam batmanglijchris tomsonchris baiocontra
"join us next week when our guests will be a cat and a baby cat"

(via Rostam’s instagram)

"join us next week when our guests will be a cat and a baby cat"

(via Rostam’s instagram)

rostam batmanglijvampire weekend

Vampire Weekend: eating & drinking

vampire weekendchris baiorostam batmanglijezra koenigchris tomson
Ezra Koenig at the Red Hat Amphitheater in Raleigh, NC

Ezra Koenig at the Red Hat Amphitheater in Raleigh, NC

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